BASF will be reusing plastic waste to create feedstock for absorbent polymers, engineered plastics, polyurethanes, and other new products at the BASF TotalEnergies Petrochemicals facility in Port Arthur, Texas (picture). Image credit: BASF

BASF bolstering plastic circular economy in the USA

26 February 2024 15:59

Ludwigshafen/ Port Arthur - BASF will convert plastic waste that can be difficult to recycle into feedstock for new products at its facility in Port Arthur, Texas. The facility will use chemical recycling to develop a circular economy in plastic that will reduce greenhouse gases emitted when producing new plastic from fossil fuels. 

Currently, Americans recycle less than 9 percent of their plastic waste. Now German industrial giant BASF is expanding its production of recycled plastic products in the United States.

In a press release issued on February 21, the company said it would be reusing plastic waste to create feedstock for absorbent polymers, engineered plastics, polyurethanes, and other new products at the BASF TotalEnergies Petrochemicals facility in Port Arthur, Texas. This process will cut down greenhouse gas emissions associated with generating new plastic.

“As a pioneer in the industry for advanced recycling, BASF is building on its experience, innovative strength, and great partnerships along the value chain to create a more circular economy for plastics,” said BASF North America Senior Vice President for Petrochemicals Gulay Serhatkulu. “By using recycled raw materials at the beginning of the chemical value chain, plastic waste becomes a resource, creating value for the environment, society, and the economy.”

The Port Arthur facility will focus on leveraging chemicals to bolter a circular economy in mixed plastics and plastic with residues that can be difficult to recycle and would otherwise head for a landfill. The new products will be part of BASF’s Ccycled brand.

“New products from advanced recycling have the same properties as products using fossil-derived building blocks,” said Johanne Wilson, who serves as business development manager for BASF’s proprietary ChemCycling recycling. “Our customers can process Ccycled products in the same way as conventionally manufactured products for use in their downstream businesses including high-performance packaging and demanding applications such as automotive or construction.” ce/jd